Interviews

May 5, 2015

Artist Spotlight: Ana Cracion

By mikestanky in Interviews, LRR, Uncategorized

Ana Cracion isn’t the typical artist covered by our Artist Spotlight series this semester. She’s a second year MFA student with the University of Connecticut’s Puppet Arts Program. I caught up with Ana at the Puppet Lab, UConn’s very own puppet facility on Depot Campus, only a short drive from main campus. 

A classroom in the puppet lab.

A classroom in the puppet lab.

M: Where are you from? How did you end up doing puppetry?

A: I’m from Romania. And I did, I think I have a photo when me and my sister, we had bunk beds. So I have a photo. I was maybe four or five. And I have a marionette on strings that I made myself. I didn’t make it, like make it. But do you know those babies, that you know, girls used to have? I had a clown. So I put the clown on strings. And I was like four or five. I can show you that picture. And my path was probably kind of set. Then I was doing a lot of craft when I was a child. I was sculpting in clay and just like getting dirt with my grandmothers farm. And just making from simple not even clay, the clay that pottery makers use, but like dirt because I wasn’t very exposed to an environment that I got to be creative. I think if I would have had, in my hometown, which was like a provincial town. If we had puppet theater more maybe that was, but I think it turned out okay.

Workshop in the puppet lab.

Workshop in the puppet lab.

M: Do you think people are afraid of the word puppetry?

A: I think they weren’t accustomed with it. I think the tradition—we had puppetry tradition before the communism but when the communism came they made the puppet theater only for children. That’s when they said this was only going to be educational maybe. Because the mentality overall, it was this oppression. They were arresting poets, writers. and Romania in between the wars, it was an extraordinary place. It was like Paris. But then it changed. Everything went into gray and that mentality of scared, and it’s a long story of what was going on there. And you can still feel that mentality. People are saying “no” a lot. They cannot see, they don’t dream. So that’s how I ended up here because I was dreaming. And I was upset that a lot of people are telling no to me and they cannot see what I see.

 

 

This horse marionette is the latest addition to Ana's puppet creations. While the face took two hours to construct, the finished puppet took two weeks from conception to completion.

This horse marionette is the latest addition to Ana’s puppet creations. While the face took two hours to construct, the finished puppet took two weeks from conception to completion.

M: How long does it take, on average, to make a puppet?

A: Well, it depends. If you’re going to make a small figurine for the toy theater, it’s going to take one hour. If you’re going to make a marionette, it can from one week to several weeks, depending on how complex it is. It’s all about just getting out the idea and then putting it, deciding on what materials you’re going to use, how it’s going to move, how you’re going to paint it. It takes as time as the puppet wants to come out.

M: What’s your next project? 

A: I’m ready for a new one. This new story found me through a dress. I was wearing a dress one time just doing a project with Sarah. And I looked at the label. And I wanted to buy a similar dress because it’s like a vintage one. And it said “union workers.” And I looked it up on the Internet and I arrived by information to the international ladies garment union. And I found out about a fire that took place in 1911 in New York. Where like 123 women died and they were all seamstresses. And something just made me look forward, look deeper into that and I found out there was a girl from Romania that came with her family in 1907 and she lost her life in that fire. And that made it, I knew that was kind of my story when I started reading about it. But when I saw that there was somebody that was from my country made it more personal. And I want to tell the story of her coming here and just having the same dream as so many other women, just having a normal life or a decent life and getting mixed up in all this union and businessman and the garment industry of the time and ending up in that stupid fire. So this is my project right now.

M: What do you want people to walk away with after a performance of yours?

A: I think just an open mind. And just, you know, the idea that objects are around us and they’ve been around us for a long time and we interact with them and communicate with them. And puppets are objects and puppets or dolls have been with us since we were in caves. That’s how we were telling stories. So moving away from this environment and considering that that’s just something for children. For me, I think people taking a bit, are pushing away a part of their soul. So open their soul back to this land, this world of storytelling. Puppets are our representations in the inanimate world. We explain to ourselves, we explain the world around us through these objects. Puppeteer says yes to each other and the world. This is the message of this place, that they say “Yeah, go ahead, do it, experience it, try it.” even though it might not work, but you tried it. You learned something from it.

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April 28, 2015

Journal Feature: The Blueshift

By Theresa Kurzawa in Feature Story, Interviews, LRR

I had the pleasure of speaking with Tyler Tsay, the editor-in-chief, of the profound new literary journal The Blueshift Journal. This journal features young, relatively undiscovered writers and artists, hoping that great art will provide an ethereal closeness between humans. Tsay is only a senior in high school himself and yet he has managed to create a beautiful web-based literary journal featuring the works of young literary enthusiasts around the globe.

As a young editor myself, I was quickly captivated by the tenacity and wholesome ambition of Tsay. I asked him questions about how the journal functions (considering many of the other editors are scattered across the US) as well as his aspirations for the future. Tsay is one of those special human beings who retains the optimism of art and literature, when so many of us have long given up hope for the future.

 

The Blueshift Journal

  •  How does the journal fund itself? Does it rely mostly on donations and profits from fundraising?
We originally raised $1,500 for the journal itself, and since then have been running off that.  We have limited donations via Tip Jar submissions, where authors/artists submit for a donation fee of $3.00 (of which we make about $2), and through the donation tab on our website, theblueshiftjournal.com.  However, as a small, online press, we generally do not have to worry too much about funding.  By issue 4, we might need to start fundraising again, but in the meantime, we’re in a good place.
  • What sort of circulation does your journal have?
Our audience is mainly young.  About 70% of our readers are around the ages of 17-35 for both male and female.  However, we publish all ages, have published all ages, and never see age as a factor for our issues.  Our staff is young, and the journal itself is young, so we obviously attract a younger crowd.  Eventually, we will start to move away from that, as both our staff and the journal itself mature.
  • What is the biggest challenge for the journal? Were there any major obstacles in the way?
 
There were plenty of obstacles, mainly being that there’s not really a how-to on starting a literary magazine.  I think starting out was the hardest part.  For the first three weeks of our start, we were actually The Copper Context on an advertisement-ridden Google website.  Obviously, that has changed a lot.  Getting the issue itself was much more difficult than we imagined, since Claire (managing), Lily (exec), and I were in separate parts of the world (I think Claire was in Greece, Lily was in the forests of Maine, and I was somewhere all around in the US).  But we’ve really worked out the kinks for this next issue.  We switched over the Submittable, brought on a Layout Manager and more Interns, and we’re definitely getting the hang of things.
  • What are the biggest challenges for the editors?
If you’re referring to the upper management (Claire, Lily, and I), I would say that it’s hard to keep everything together when we’re at three separate schools in three separate locations trying to create an issue.  But that’s always a challenge.
In terms of the actual editors and readers, I think that the biggest challenge is probably the fact that very few of us have met each other in person.  We’re going to try to organize get-togethers, but sometimes, I can feel that it’s hard to interact when we haven’t yet put the faces to the names to the people to the voices.  In order to combat this, we offer our staff a position back every issue (unless something drastic changes, or they have to leave for undisclosed reasons), so that they can see the magazine grow with them, and get to know each other along the way.  I think we’ve truly gotten close as a staff.  It’s my favorite part of the whole thing that I never really anticipated.
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  • What does an editor like most and least about being an editor?
I know that as an editor, I’ve grown so much as a writer being exposed to the incredible array of submissions we receive, both good and bad.  Albeit, I haven’t written much in the past few years, only privately.  But I know that editing is one of the best ways to improve your writing.  You learn what works, what doesn’t, what styles appeal to you, what don’t.  There’s a bridge between exposing yourself and copying, of course, but if you are mindful of the gap, you can grow a lot.
The biggest challenge is going against the flow of other readers and editors.  I don’t encourage controversy, but I especially work hard to make sure that if five readers like a piece and one doesn’t, that one reader doesn’t feel pressured into liking the piece.  Because we’re all online and comments/votes by all readers are posted online through Submittable and are visible to all readers, that can be a challenge sometimes.  We’ve gotten more comfortable with each other, though, so I think that we’re more ok with arguing against each other if need be.
  • Where do you see your journal in 10 years?
I don’t think I even know where I want to be in 10 years, much less the journal.  At this point, I see a very clear cut path for my role at the journal through college.  To be honest, I’m in this because of art for art’s sake.  As long as we can keep discovering and publishing good art, I see no reason to change our trajectory.
  • Would you consider aesthetic more important than the content of the magazine, vice versa, or are both equally important to the magazine?
The content shapes the aesthetic, so I think that both are equally important.  As I said above, art for art’s sake.  We want to find good work.  We rarely happen to have a bias, or a certain theme or trajectory in mind.  I think there’s definitely a style of writing we like.  We have always played with the idea of perspective and loneliness.  But we’re out there to discover good writing and good art, so I would probably choose content over aesthetic if I had to go for one.
  • What kind of feedback do you get from your readers? Mostly positive or mostly negative?
We’ve been getting great feedback!  We actually just had a review published by The Review Review, giving us 4/5 stars for our first issue.  We’re shooting for that 5 for next issue, of course :)

Tsay’s optimism shines through with every piece printed in the journal, allowing the works of others to bring us all closer as one, feeling, thinking thing. The journal’s ultimate goal is human connection and I can say for certain that in reading the works published in issues one and two, I have never felt closer to a group of young strangers in my life. I look forward to see what new adventures through the human mind await in their next issue.
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April 21, 2015

An Interview with Rattle Magazine Editor Timothy Green

By joshcouvares in Interviews

About a week ago, I had the pleasure to interview Timothy Green, an editor for Rattle.
For those who don’t know, Rattle is a literary magazine based out of Los Angeles and founded in 1994 by Alan Fox. What is interesting about this is that Alan Fox is not someone who you would think of as a literary writer—he was a lawyer and real estate investor long before he began his own literary magazine. Because Alan Fox is a “non-poet,” if you will, Rattle has a different aesthetic from any other magazine out there. The magazine strives to keep poetry from being a medium exclusive to literary crowds or other poets; it wants poetry to be read by everyday people. Perhaps Rattle’s goal is best summed up by the following sentence from their website: “it shouldn’t take a scholar to be moved by the written word—great literature has something to offer everyone.”
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Without further introduction, the following is my interview with Timothy Green:
JC: What do you think makes Rattle different from all of the other hundreds of magazines out there?
TG: Well, first of all we’re much larger.  There are only a handful (maybe six?) magazines that publish poetry and have a larger circulation or more web traffic. We’re also far more independent than most — with no ties whatsoever to any academic community.  None of us are literary insiders — we try to build a community from the ground up, and care a lot about openness and equanimity. We only publish poems that have been submitted to the “slush pile,” as they call it — we don’t solicit poems from anyone.  If Billy Collins is in our issue, it’s because he submitted like anyone else.  We encourage submissions and feel like it’s central to what we do as a non-profit.

JC: What do you imagine as Rattle’s ideal reader?

Our founding editor, Alan Fox, is a real estate investor and lawyer, not a “professional” poet. Our ideal reader is really him — someone who like to think about the world and our place within it, but doesn’t self-identify as a poet, necessarily.  We imagine a random person picking up a copy of Rattle in a doctor’s office waiting room, because it’s more curious than Cosmo — they see that it’s poetry, but think they don’t like poetry.  Then they read a poem and say, Hey, poetry’s pretty cool, I liked that.  That’s our ideal reader.JC: What do you want your readers to get out of Rattle?  To put this another way, what kind of conversation do you see the Rattle having with its readers? 

We want them to remember the poems they read, to feel “rattled,” so to speak, and to be inspired to write and share poems of their own.  Nothing’s more fun than publishing a poem that was a response to a previous poem that we published — that’s happened quite a few times, and it’s always great to see.  Poetry is a dialogue more than anything else — we want people to want to be part of the dialogue.JC: Is there anything in particular look for in the submissions you receive?

Memorable things that we haven’t seen before, things that makes us feel new feelings and see the world in new ways, musical lines that stick in our heads.  That’s pretty much it.  I read 100,000 poems a year — it’s hard to be unique or original next to that volume.  When poems are unique, they stand out, and you remember them.  If I remember them, having read that many poems, I figure our readers will remember them, too, and that’s the point.

JC: What would you like people to know the most about Rattle?

 

We don’t play stupid literary games; we just like poetry when it means something and sings, and we’re probably the best home for your poems there is today.

JC: Is there any advice you would like to give to young, unpublished writers?

Just keep plugging away.  It is a game, and rejection is part of the game.  The most “successful” poets aren’t necessarily the most talented, they’re just the ones that stick in it the longest without getting bored or giving up.  If you’re patient, there’s no doubt you’ll get things published, and if you keep working at telling your story, there are people who will love to listen.
Please check out the magazine at their website, http://www.rattle.com.
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April 11, 2015

This is What It Feels Like To Be Alive – Interviewing Claire Kilroy

By Nikki Barnhart in Interviews, LRR

My first question for author Claire Kilroy is, “what has changed since your last visit to UConn?” This is her second time visiting – the first being six years ago in 2009. Her response: “I’ve had a child.”

 

Right now, Kilroy is primarily a mother. Before our interview, she spoke on the phone to her two year old son before his bedtime, offering words of comfort. One of the most striking things about her is the loveliness of her voice – bold and strong when reading out loud from her work, and soft and soothing in conversation. She’s a thoughtful speaker; she takes time to formulate her responses into incredibly eloquent responses. In-person interviews are difficult, but she seems at ease.

 

“It’s been the most eventful six years of my life,” she tells me. “Motherhood is a huge change. When I last came here, I was single and childless. It shows you how quickly life can change. Part of me wants to find that person who I was in 2009, part of me is happy as a mother.”

 

I ask her about her roots – out of college, she worked as an assistant editor for the BBC drama “Ballykissangel.” I ask what writing for the screen taught her about writing for the page.

 

“I taught me a huge amount,” she says. “It taught me about the plasticity of narrative and the discipline of plot.” She still draws from this training today.

 

We talk about the larger question of Irish literature. Writers like Wilde and Beckett and of course Joyce are celebrities of the canon, but I ask Kilroy about some Irish authors many people may not be familiar with.

 

John Banville is her favorite, she says. (In an answer to the Q&A session after her reading, she told the audience to “read him now before he wins the Nobel.”)

 

“I’m teaching him now,” she says. “You fear that that things you read as a younger person may…turn to shit,” she says, “but they just get better. Your capacity for greatness grows.”

 

She also mentions Anne Enright (“sharp as a knife”) and some younger writers, such as Paul Murray (“brilliant, funny, sad”) and Kevin Barry (“you’ll read him in the New Yorker.”

 

I ask what sets Irish literature apart from the rest of the world. How do the Irish maintain a unique and distinct identity through their work?

 

“There’s a sort of chaotic nature to Irish life that more ordered and disciplined nations may not have,” says Kilroy. “Our fiction tackles that chaos and wildness. It’s very human and reassuring, and unsettling, somehow. It’s reassuring to see all of man – and not make you feel like you have to be well-behaved. It teaches you to embrace human nature. It’s fearless, messy, there’s no expectation.”

 

I ask her how she contributes to this tradition and she says simply, “I’m just responding to being alive. This is what it feels like.”

 

In her reading, Kilroy spoke of her characters as if they were real people – with a deep understanding of their flaws, but an incredible fondness. I ask her if she considers her work to be character driven and she thinks about it for a moment, and then responds with a strong yes.

 

“I look for feeling and mood and emotion and use a plot to carry them, “ she says.

 

“What I love in a book is when I read it and say, “I felt that. I understand that. Oh yeah. I know what you meant. And I prefer subtle things.”

 

At her reading, there was some talk about the question “is the novel dead?” I ask her and she responds with a resounding and firm no.

 

“We’re storytellers,” she says, and I can tell she means all of us as a human race.

 

“The more I write, the more interesting language is. Sentences are endlessly exhilarating. If you apply your imagination to them, if you sit down and write stuff out, other stuff comes out and that’s exhilarating to me. It can take a long time for a great sentence, but it’s worth it. You’ve validated yourself rather than coast along.

It feels like being fully alive.

 

“Life gets in the way, but if you set something on paper, it’s artifact that to your time on Earth.”

 

 

The most wonderful thing about Claire Kilroy is her fierce passion and vivacity for both life and literature, separate entities that she connects effortlessly.

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