Becoming the Writer That I’ve Always Been

By: Julia Alexander

Ever since I could read and write, I have been infatuated with storytelling. I remember the desk in my childhood bedroom overflowing with half-filled notebooks and the scraps of torn out pages. My handwriting, barely legible to anyone but myself, was scrawled across papers that were stalked high like mountains. My older sister, always vigilant,… More Becoming the Writer That I’ve Always Been By: Julia Alexander

What to Read if You Had a Year Left to Live

By: Sydney Lauro

Prognosis: you’ve got twelve months left to live. The good news? If you’re literate, you could easily read a book a month. Therefore, it’s time to give up Grey’s Anatomy and escape Meredith’s constant, cliché, and contrived diatribes about life and actually consume a worthwhile use of the English language. January: Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and… More What to Read if You Had a Year Left to Live By: Sydney Lauro

Podcasting and the Resurgence of the Oral Tradition

by Diana Koehm

A hush falls over the clearing. The hunter’s voice rings with a metallic clang. The bodies huddled around the fireplace feel the blade pierce the beast’s hide as if it were their own. Before writing, there was word of mouth. Our humble literary blog, and the larger literature scene as we understand it today, would… More Podcasting and the Resurgence of the Oral Tradition by Diana Koehm

On writing the teenage character

by Asiya Haouchine

People give J.D. Salinger too much flak about his ability to write when it comes to Holden Caulfield of Salinger’s most famous novel, The Catcher in the Rye. When adults (and students) complain about Holden and discuss how annoying he is, I get why they might think that—Holden is whiny at times and disillusioned about… More On writing the teenage character by Asiya Haouchine

Revolutionizing Literature: Literary Magazines and the Digital Age

by Alexandra Cichon

In the wee hours of the morning, with the DIAGRAM magazine tab open in my browser, I surf the magazine’s current issue, absorbing each pixel of avant-garde poems and clicking rapidly between diagrams. Besides my unequivocal love for the concept DIAGRAM pushes—“odd but good”— oozing from the crisp white and black aesthetic of each issue,… More Revolutionizing Literature: Literary Magazines and the Digital Age by Alexandra Cichon

Some Faerie Good Reads for a Courtly Spring Break

By Theresa Kurzawa

With Spring Break approaching fast, it’s time to stock up on some books to last you the week. Whether you’re spending your time at home or on a beach, a good read is essential for any successful break from school. The books that become popular in the Young Adult genre of literature range from a… More Some Faerie Good Reads for a Courtly Spring Break By Theresa Kurzawa

Remembering Nikolai Vasilyevich Gogol

By Emily Catenzaro

“It is well-known that there are many faces in the world over the finishing of which nature did not take much trouble, did not employ any fine tools such as files, gimlets, and so on, but simply hacked them out with round strokes: one chop-a nose appears; another chop-lips appear; eyes are scooped out with… More Remembering Nikolai Vasilyevich Gogol By Emily Catenzaro

Where did the quotation mark go?

by Steph Koo

We are approaching copyediting time at the Long River Review and it has me thinking about grammar, punctuation, and writing style—leading me to this question: Why do some authors do away with the quotation mark in dialogue? Perhaps I am noticing it more as I am reading more “serious literature” for my classes now, versus… More Where did the quotation mark go? by Steph Koo

GET SLAPPED IN THE FACE BY LITERATURE: A Small Suggestion on How to Start Reading Again

By Therese Masotta

“The one you love and the one who loves you are never, ever the same person.” — from Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahniuk I didn’t always like to read. (What?! But you’re an English major!) Yes I am studying English and no, I did not always like to read. It’s okay, it happens to the… More GET SLAPPED IN THE FACE BY LITERATURE: A Small Suggestion on How to Start Reading Again By Therese Masotta